Humans Evolving: A story of adaptation

Humans Evolving: A story of adaptation

Everything that humans do today - from breathing and walking to falling in love, typing on a computer, or driving a car - we do because our biology enables us to do it. That biology, our biology, is the result of millions and millions of years of evolution. 

The lecture, adapted for the Grainger Sky Theater’s unique 360-degree dome environment, will lead the audience on a journey through seven evolutionary snapshots that trace our lineage from before the split with chimpanzees to inhabiting six of the seven continents we live on today. Along the way, Dr. Hlusko will explore how human evolution, geography, and climate change are intertwined and how humans are subject to the same evolutionary forces that influence all of Earth’s life forms.

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  • Adler Planetarium (map)
Ethics Without God? The Evolution Of Morality And Empathy In The Primates

Ethics Without God? The Evolution Of Morality And Empathy In The Primates

For many years, Frans de Waal has observed chimpanzees soothe distressed neighbors and bonobos share their food. In this talk, based on his book, The Bonobo and the Atheist, he will deliver fascinating evidence for the seeds of ethical behavior in primate societies that further cements the case for the biological origins of human fairness.

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  • Houston Museum of Natural History (map)
Primate Conservation in a Rapidly Changing World

Primate Conservation in a Rapidly Changing World

Karen B. Strier will trace the behavioral, ecological, and demographic changes over her 31-year study of a growing population of one of the world’s most critically endangered primates, the northern muriqui of Brazil. The northern muriqui has captured international attention for its exceptionally peaceful behavior and egalitarian society. Yet today, fewer than 1,000 individuals remain in only about a dozen isolated forest fragments in southeastern Brazil.

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  • Cleveland Museum of Natural History (map)
The Shape of Human Evolution

The Shape of Human Evolution

Walking upright on two legs is the hallmark of the human lineage. Understanding when and how we made the transition to this unique way of moving about the world is key to deciphering how, and why, we evolved. In recent decades, more bones associated with the trunk have been discovered for fossil hominins, shedding new light on the evolution of body form in apes and humans. New 3D imaging technologies allow us to study these fossils in new ways. These insights into the evolution of human body form paint a striking picture of the transition from ape to hominin, leading to a new way of thinking about our origins. 

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  • California Academy of Sciences (map)